Hartill 22.721 Prince Qing Hui Mint Xian Feng Red Copper 1000 Cash 1854 Beijing

Hartill 22.721 Prince Qing Hui Mint Xian Feng Red Copper 1000 Cash 1854 Beijing

ANCIENT CHINA
Qing Dynasty

Xian Feng Yuan Bao, Pure Copper 1000 cash,

The Prince Qing Hui Mint

 

cast May to August 1854 only

 

Authenticity guaranteed for all items!

Reference: Hartill 22.721

Weight: 108 grams; Size: 61 mm; Material: Red Copper

 

Mintmark: star and crescent

The Prince Qing Hui Mint

Obv: Xiang Feng Yuan Bao

Rev:

 (   .
  當

ᠪᠣᠣ   ᠴᡳᠣᠸᠠᠨ

 千

Manchurian inscription "Bao Quan"

Board of Revenue

Dang 1000 - equal to 1000 cash

The Prince Qing Hui Mint

In April 1854, the Prince Qing Hui, Ke Qin, along with others, memorialized requesting permission to levy copper for casting large coins and to establish a mint because of the dire state of payments to the army. They proposed to collect 200,000 or 300,000 jin of copper, from which it was calculated that 100,000 strings of coins could be cast. In May, the Prince reported that he had established three furnaces. In July, he requested permission to cast large coins Value Two Hundred, Three Hundred, and Four Hundred. On the 24th day of the same month, the casting of Value Two Hundred to One Thousand stopped. By August 1854, the Prince Qing Hui mint did not have sufficient copper to supplement the casting of regulation coins, and was ordered to close immediately. The surplus copper was transferred to the Board of Revenue, and the workforce was disbanded.

 

The Xianfeng Emperor

The Xianfeng Emperor (simplified Chinese: 咸丰帝; traditional Chinese: 咸豐帝; 17 July 1831 – 22 August 1861), personal name I-ju (or Yizhu), was the ninth Emperor of the Manchu-led Qing dynasty, and the seventh Qing emperor to rule over China, from 1850 to 1861.

The Xianfeng Emperor's reign saw the continued decline of the Qing dynasty. Rebellions in the country, which began the first year of his reign, would not be quelled until well into the reign of the Tongzhi Emperor and resulted in millions of deaths. The Xianfeng Emperor also had to deal with the British and French and their ever growing appetite to expand trade further into China. The Xianfeng Emperor, like his father, the Daoguang Emperor, understood very little about Europeans and their mindset. He viewed non-Chinese as inferior and regarded the Europeans' repeated requests for the establishment of diplomatic relations as an offence. When the Europeans introduced the long-held concept of an exchanged consular relationship, the Xianfeng Emperor quickly rebuffed the idea. At the time of his death, he had not met with any foreign dignitary.
Despite his tumultuous decade of reign, the Xianfeng Emperor was commonly seen as the last Qing emperor to have held paramount authority, ruling in his own right. His son and subsequent successors' rule were overseen by regents, a trend witnessed until the fall of the Qing dynasty.

The Hsien Feng period was one of great strife in China. The Tai-ping rebellion, which lasted from 1853 to 1864 and was at least partly responsible for inflation resulting in paper money being issued for larger denomination (1000 and higher), and a variety of cast coin denominations from 1 to 1000 cash. The one cash coins have the standard two character mint marks on the reverses, while higher denominations have four characters with the extra two to show the denomination.

 

 

 

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Hartill 22.721 Prince Qing Hui Mint Xian Feng Red Copper 1000 Cash 1854 Beijing

$55.00Price

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